• "Whatever I can do, I do"

    Oscar, Nevada

    Oscar is a proud Latino, a disabled veteran, and a volunteer in Nevada. He is legally blind and can’t drive a car, but he makes dozens of calls for the Pahrump office on a regular basis. “I make as many calls as my eyeballs allow,” he likes to say.

    "Because of my condition, I think I can feel people pretty well from just a touch. In 2008, I went to hear Barack Obama speak in Las Vegas and I shook his hand. Just from that handshake, I felt his warmth and his eagerness to bring change. I thought to myself, that’s one heck of a man.

    "Once Barack Obama became president, I started seeing changes in the Veterans Administration. I visited the VA clinic here in Pahrump and they helped me purchase a monitor that allows me to read by magnifying images 1,000 percent, so I can see what I’m doing. It helped me realize that life goes on after blindness.

    "It really upsets me when people act like I’m leeching off America because I’m disabled. I damaged my eyesight fighting for my country in Vietnam and it hurts to see others have no compassion for disabled veterans. At the end of the day, that’s why I’m voting for Barack Obama—because he supports veterans like me.

    "If it weren’t for him, I wouldn’t have the home I have right now. I was able to receive a refund thanks to his expansion of tax credits, and now my house is paid off already.

    "If I needed any other reasons to support the man, I have three more: Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security. I’ve found that it’s inevitable—especially for people like me—that either you pass away young or you live long enough to reach a point where you have to rely on a safety net to help you.

    "Whatever I can do, I do. When I can, I earnestly go out there and try to help give President Obama another four years. We need to win this election."

    Oscar, Nevada

    2012 Stories