• Robots and Rockets at the White House Science Fair

    At the second annual White House Science Fair today, President Obama honored the work of over 100 budding inventors. The President got to hear all about the students’ inventions, from a portable disaster shelter to a dissolvable sugar packet that could save millions of pounds of trash per year. After meeting with the students, the President announced a plan to give schools across the country more support for math and science teachers:

    Let’s train more teachers. Let’s get more kids studying these subjects. Let’s make sure these fields get the respect and attention that they deserve.

    But it’s not just a government effort. I’m happy to say that the private sector has answered that call as well. They understand how important it is to their future. So today, led by the Carnegie Corporation, a group of businesses and foundations is announcing a $22 million fund to help train 100,000 new science and math teachers. A coalition of more than 100 CEOs is expanding innovative math and science programs to 130 sites across the country. And other companies are partnering—everybody from Will.i.am to Dean Kamen—to make sure we celebrate young scientists and inventors and engineers, not just at the White House, but in every city and every town all across America.

    And many of these leaders are here today, and I want to thank them for doing their part. We’re going to do everything we can to partner to help you succeed in your projects. And I’m proud to announce that the budget I unveil next week will include programs to help prepare new math and science teachers, and to meet an ambitious goal, which is 1 million more American graduates in science, technology, engineering, and math over the next 10 years. That is a goal we can achieve.

    For more on the President’s announcement and this year’s White House Science Fair, check out the White House blog.