• A fall visit to New Hampshire

    President Obama in Manchester

    “I'm fired up about this weather. I mean, I've got to say that generally when I look at a trip to New Hampshire in October, I'm not thinking it’s going to look like this. But this is spectacular. It’s good to be back.”
    —President Obama in Manchester, New Hampshire today

    It was a beautiful fall day in Manchester for the President’s visit, and thousands of Granite Staters packed a park to see him speak about the stark choice that was on full display in Tuesday’s debate.

    Maura:
    “I’m here for the chance to see him in person. I couldn’t be more proud of his performance at the debate this week. Our parents had JFK, and we have Barack Obama. When Mitt Romney said he cared about 100% of the American people, I knew that was a slam-dunk moment for the President—because it’s just not true.”

    Maura and Philip

    Philip:
    “The economy is coming back—I have faith that we’re on the right track. We can’t derail this progress by electing Romney. If you watched the debate this week, you know President Obama is the candidate working for the middle class.”

    High school seniors Jhané and Bianca came up from Nashua with their dad, Victor.

    Victor:
    “I've brought the girls to see the President because I want them to see how important this election is. Stepping up, getting involved, and having a voice.”

    Jhané:
    Bianca and I are only 17, so we can't vote this November. I turn 18 just a few days too late. But that's why I've signed up to volunteer here in New Hampshire—I will know I've played an important part in getting President Obama re-elected.”

    Bianca was most interested in what the President had to say about women’s equality.

    “What Romney is saying about women's health care and Planned Parenthood is a concern to me and to my friends. No man should have a say over my body, unless he is my doctor.”

    President Obama’s take?

    “We want our sons to thrive in math and science and engineering, but we also want our daughters to thrive in those fields, too. See, we don’t have to order up some binders to find qualified, talented, driven young women who can learn and excel in these fields right now. And when these young women graduate, I want them to receive equal pay for equal work.”

    The sense of urgency among the crowd was palpable, and willing volunteers were all around.

    Jon, a small business owner:
    “I've brought a big group of us here today because it's important that we are all in this together. All of us, getting fired up and ready to go for the final three weeks of this campaign!"

    After seeing the President for the first time today, Kate and her 12-year-old daughter, Rachel, are making big plans for the weekend.

    “We're canvassing this Saturday here in Manchester. It’s going to be my first time knocking on doors for the President. I'm a little nervous about volunteering, but I know we’re down to the wire.”

    Ray puts it this way:

    “Volunteering for the President is like an insurance policy for me. I want to work to make sure we are re-electing a president who is supporting the middle class. Ensuring we have the right support will ensure our economy continues to move in the right direction.

    "New Hampshire is such an interesting state to live in during election season. Ever since Al Gore lost in 2000, we know that every dial made and every door knocked could make all the difference to us winning another four years of progress or moving back to failed policies of the past."

    Volunteer

    NH